User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
Like Tree2Likes

Thread: How to Use Spray Adhesive

  1. #1
    Cannon Fodder
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How to Use Spray Adhesive

    The Guide to Using Spray Adhesive

    1. There's alot of different brands, and most likely there's different availability depending on where you're from. I've used Super77, Krylon, and 3M.

    **2/26: I've done some research since I first wrote this... I don't like 3M spray adhesive (blue can) at all. Even after it's properly dried it's still prone to leave residue- much more than other brands I've used.

    The brand I prefer most is Krylon Spray Adhesive. When used as described in this tut, I've never had any residue left behind.

    Name:  spray3.jpg
Views: 9354
Size:  9.4 KB

    There's also specialty types of spray adhesive: re-positionable, photo-mount , etc (specially formulated to stick to photo papers). Since you're not using the adhesive for it's permanence, you might try experimenting with other brands.

    2. Shake it for at least a minute if you use the can regularly, longer if it's the first use, or you haven't used it in awhile and it's been sitting around.

    3. Spray outdoors, wearing a respirator is ideal. Inhaling this stuff is far worse for you than spray paint even. It's a super-fine mist of liquid glue and it's toxic. Remember high-school biology and diagrams of your lungs? If you continually inhale this stuff into your lungs when you use it, it gets into your lungs, it adheres, and you're gonna have major health problems later on.

    4. So again, spray outdoors, and wear a respirator if you've got one. Oh, and a bit more common sense: if it's windy, don't get it in your eyes, that'd be very, very bad, too.

    5. If you have to lay your stencil down on something to spray the adhesive, don't get the adhesive overspray on anything around it. Why? Because you'd be getting glue on whatever else is around your stencil (which usually isn't a good thing if it's your patio, carpet, a table, furniture or whatever.)

    If you have to lay your stencil down to spray it, do it on a large piece of cardboard or something else that you can throw away.

    6. I hold my stencil up in the air in one hand (gloved) and spray the adhesive with the other over the edge of my balcony. The overspray mist floats away and disperses in the air.

    Name:  spray2.jpg
Views: 9319
Size:  19.1 KB

    Again, I don't do this when it's windy.

    7. Don't hold the can close to the stencil. You want a good amount of the mist to hit it, so estimate about 12 inches from the stencil.

    >>A good amount of mist<< Not gobs of the stuff, not a thick, goo-ey layer: that's WAY too much.

    8. Lay the stencil down (adhesive side up) and let it dry for at least 4-5 minutes before you try and paint the stencil. This may vary based on how much glue you sprayed onto the stencil, the temperature and humidity, and the brand of glue you've got.

    If the glue is still wet and you try to paint with it, you'll get get glue residue on the surface of whatever you're painting. After letting it dry the 4-5 minutes, touch it and see if it feels wet. If it is, it still needs to dry for a bit. If it's tacky / sticky, but not wet, it's OK to use.

    9. While it's drying, you should be shaking up the paint that you're going to use so that it's ready.

    10. Once the glue has dried and has become tacky, put it on the surface you're gonna paint and press it down (just like you're putting up a sticker). Rub your finger along all of the of the cut-out areas of stencil to prevent underspray.

    Name:  spray1.jpg
Views: 9341
Size:  22.3 KB

    Grab the paint, spray the stencil, and peel it off.

    11. Store your stencils with a layer of wax paper in between them so they don't stick. Again if the adhesive is still wet it's gonna stick to the wax paper. Remember = the adhesive should be tacky and sticky, not wet.

    okay?

    The "I still don't get it, I have some questions" section:

    -Why do you wear a glove on the hand your holding a the stencil with?
    So I don't get glue on my hand.

    -How do I know when the adhesive is dry enough to use?
    You were skimming weren't you, did you read #8?? After letting it dry the 4-5 minutes, touch it and see if it feels wet. If it is, it still needs to dry for a bit.
    If it's tacky / sticky, but not wet, it's OK to use.

    -Why do you hold the stencil in the air when spraying the adhesive on it?
    Because I work on my back porch and I don't want glue overspray all over it.

    -What's 'wax paper' and where can I get it?
    It's usually in the baking aisle along with / near the aluminum foil at any grocery store.

    -Can you use it when you're doing work "on the streets"?
    That's not as practical as using it for "off the streets" work, but hey whatever works for you.

    So what if I get some adhesive residue on the surface?

    Name:  tut1.jpg
Views: 9131
Size:  6.5 KB

    If it's a flat non-porous surface like an LP, vinyl sticker sheet, wood, I've used this trick: tear a small piece of artist's (or masking tape) and touch the the sticky side of the tape to the glue residue, peel it off. This should pick it up from the surface if the glue hasn't been on the surface long.

    Name:  tut2.jpg
Views: 9114
Size:  7.1 KB
    Name:  tut3.jpg
Views: 9109
Size:  6.5 KB

    I don't work on fabric, so I've no idea if it will work on a shirt or whatever. If you're working on paper, you may risk pulling the paper up. Experiment cautiously.

    If you try this to get residue off your painting, be careful if the paint hasn't dried yet. If you get the tape on the paint it will obviously pull that from the surface, too!

  2. #2
    Block Lieutenant BASE45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    433
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    I prefer super 77. I actually have always hated krylon due to an early experience that didn't go well at all. I think i'll give it another try because one downside to the super 77 is that it does leave residue that is especially noticeable over black surfaces.

  3. #3
    Block Lieutenant Eye Six's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Rio Bongo World HQ
    Posts
    319
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use Krylon Easy Tack 7020 repositional for a cup of reasons: Foremost is cost...some of the spray ad's cost $15 plus -especially the ones for use in relation to photography- Krylon is Six Bucks or so. The residue is minimum (I get it on occasion but it is relatively easy to get off wood and metal)- I gotta try the tape method Renovator mentions. Good tut.
    The Gloss of Civilization Does Not Penetrate Deeply

  4. #4
    Foot Soldier Oroborus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    The Netherlands!!
    Posts
    94
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use sprayglue...i think its brandless!!
    Messed up today..sprayed my final layer..let it dry, wanna pick it up to spray..dropped it..one mess..2 hours cutting for shit!!!

  5. #5
    Recruit
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Riga, Latvia
    Posts
    30
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Excellent thread, thanks! Was just strolling through every possible website in search of some tips for using spray adhesive. I guess there is no proper cans in Latvia, only the weird Montana spray which basically is just gunks of glue no matter how you spray it. Now I found my Krylon ebay seller who can ship me a bunch of them for about 15 bucks a can. Maybe I can get them cheaper, but it's still a lot less than the 25 bucks I'd have to pay here back at home.
    the calming voice of the void

  6. #6
    Block Lieutenant BASE45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    433
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BASE45 View Post
    I prefer super 77. I actually have always hated krylon due to an early experience that didn't go well at all. I think i'll give it another try because one downside to the super 77 is that it does leave residue that is especially noticeable over black surfaces.

    I've recently found that I can simply remove the residue left behind on my canvases, from the 3M super 77, with soap and water. Then I let it dry and clear coat it. The painting looks great after!

    3M super 77 has a strong tack so it keeps even the really small detailed cuts well placed while spraying. Also it only takes a light mist or 2 to be ready to stick. The only downsides has been that its $10(est. 8 euros, or 6 pounds) and it leaves residue. Now that the residue isn't an issue, if you don't mind the price 3M is the best spray adhesive IMO.

  7. #7
    Cannon Fodder AmputatedSilhouette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    15
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ^I dont get why you'd use something thats meant to be permanant, is more exspensive, leaves residue and has to be cleaned with soap n water vs. stuff that doesn't leave residue

  8. #8
    CGI
    CGI is offline
    Block Lieutenant CGI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    412
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    use spray adhesive and youll know why.
    I do drugs and I am cool, dont you want to be cool too?

  9. #9
    Block Lieutenant BASE45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    433
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    meant to be permanant
    Because if you spray a minimal amount you still get adequate adhesion. Non-permanent adhesives tend to need a good amount sprayed on to be effective.

    more exspensive
    Because if you compare cost to "effective" amount of adhesive, it's less expensive than most non permanent spray adhesives(krylon in mind). My super 77 cans last months and I spray a decent amount. From experience they seem to have the best longevity.

    leaves residue
    Because the residue can be cleaned off simply with soap and water, and the results/performance of the adhesive are incomparable in my opinion/experience.

    has to be cleaned with soap n water
    It only takes 2 minutes really.



    Overall it's worth it to me. Extra work and few bucks is a small price to pay for guaranteed hard defined edges. Believe me I'm CHEAP when it comes to art supplies so I wouldn't waste the money if it wasn't good stuff.

  10. #10
    Cannon Fodder AmputatedSilhouette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    15
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    @cgi, i have, just wanted to se e why base is a fan of the 77. ive bought about 5 brands, or more.
    @base, ok, you feel like its better,to each his own

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •